Media Industry / Economics

Data Representation and Media Literacy

Mathematics and science have always been relevant to applying media literacy, but there is now a true urgency to providing students and adults with the fluency they need to put media literacy to use in evaluating quantitative as well as qualitative information. In this issue of Connections, we interview two leaders of data-centric organizations. We also report on the International Media Literacy Research Symposium and GAPMIL NA meetings recently held in Portugal. 

Bots, Terrorism, and Media Literacy

This is our 100th issue of Connections! We appreciate the interest and support of the media literacy community.  In this issue,  we interview two scholars who explain how terrorism has infiltrated the online world, how computational social science focuses on predicting future behavior in regards to terrorism, how bots undermine our trust in social media, and how media literacy can help.  Interviews with Dr.

ESL and Media Literacy

While teaching English as a second language isn’t often a focus of discussions for media literacy, the number of ESL students alone should argue for more emphasis and visibility for this educational imperative. CML interviewed Raul Alberto Mora, Ph.D., who emphasizes language learning and critical media literacy in his work with university students and preservice teachers in Medellin, Colombia, as well as Camilo Andres Dominguez-Cruz, a native of Colombia, who now teaches ESL in a North Carolina primary school, Sallie B. Howard School for the Arts and Education. 
 

Trust Through Technology?

Should we place hope in technology for solving some of the problems technology helped create? Maybe. One approach worth looking at is BlockChain (distributed ledger technology) which might help to solve the riddle of where information originates, and how it morphs and proliferates.  CML interviewed Ian O’Byrne, internationally recognized educator and researcher, on the topic of BlockChain technology and its connections to media literacy. 

Sports and Media Literacy

This issue of Connections looks at how technology and new data are changing the narrative around sports and media, and how that changes our experience as consumers and participants.  Sports provide an excellent opportunity to not only learn people skills and health information, but they offer excellent arenas for math and science and algorithmic thinking – and of course, media literacy.  And this includes sports cars, too. We have an interview with Wil Cashen, Tesla Foundation. 

Citizenship in the Digital Age

This issue focuses on the 2016 presidential election, where technology is going and the challenges that we face in teaching about it. CML interviewed two media literacy advocates – Stephen Balkam from Family Online Safety Institute and Tara O’Gorman, a teacher from a media literacy magnet school in New York. Also includes resources and MediaLit Moments Activity on Fake News. This is Part 1 of a series on Citizenship in the Digital Age.

Education and The Creative Economy: Australia

This month we continue to explore Education and The Creative Economy by featuring exciting initiatives being undertaken in Australia, where media literacy is now embedded in the national curriculum through media arts, and where the Australian government has prioritized supporting and growing the creative economy.  CML interviewed two Australian education/media literacy leaders, one who works in higher education – Michael Dezuanni -- and the other in secondary education, Roger Dunscombe.

Education and The Creative Economy

How is education tied to the creative economy? One of the answers is obvious--the 4 C’s of creativity, collaboration, communication and critical thinking. These are skills encouraged through media literacy and deployed by workers in the creative economy, from publishing and printing to furniture and decorative arts. This issue discusses Richard Florida’s pathbreaking book The Rise of the Creative Classes, and show how workers in the creative industries have shaped the nature of work for many in the U.S.

Pages