Media Advocacy / Activism

Citizenship in the Digital Age

This issue focuses on the 2016 presidential election, where technology is going and the challenges that we face in teaching about it. CML interviewed two media literacy advocates – Stephen Balkam from Family Online Safety Institute and Tara O’Gorman, a teacher from a media literacy magnet school in New York. Also includes resources and MediaLit Moments Activity on Fake News. This is Part 1 of a series on Citizenship in the Digital Age.

Education and The Creative Economy: Australia

This month we continue to explore Education and The Creative Economy by featuring exciting initiatives being undertaken in Australia, where media literacy is now embedded in the national curriculum through media arts, and where the Australian government has prioritized supporting and growing the creative economy.  CML interviewed two Australian education/media literacy leaders, one who works in higher education – Michael Dezuanni -- and the other in secondary education, Roger Dunscombe.

Documentary Film and Media Literacy

In this issue of Connections, we discuss the art and craft of documentary, a genre which utilizes techniques that differ widely from fiction film, including investigation and presentation of evidence, interviews, moral inquiry, calls to action, presentation of human relationships for emotional impact, and much more.   The MediaLit Moments activity is He Named Me Malala. The activity uses the 2015 documentary of the same name.

Media Literacy and Human Rights

The constructed nature of media is highly visible in examples of human rights coverage – from genocide to disabilities to incidents of civic rights violations.  CML offers diverse examples of construction at work.  This issue also includes highlights from the first US Media Literacy Week as well as an interview with Robert Ferguson about his work with Roma populations in the UK.

 

Community Media

Active participation by citizens.  Local community engagement.  Expanding media access to all.  Empowerment through education.  Tackling tough issues in communities.  Freedom of speech.  Storytelling. Citizen journalism.  Understanding media and how it operates.  Where do all of these important undertakings – essential to media literacy -- happen?  In community media centers around the U.S. and the world.  In this issue we provide two case examples of community media centers and their commitment to media literacy education: one in Dublin, Ireland and one in Brookline, Massachusetts.

What's in a Name?

In 2006 Henry Jenkins published a white paper identifying the challenges and opportunities for media literacy in our 21st century media culture. Since then, new ideas, new technologies, and new names have emerged bringing with them misunderstandings and rifts among educators. It’s time to reflect on where we’ve been and where we are now.  

The U.S. Department of Education

In March 2008, the US Department of Education’s Office of Educational Technology convened an information session on media literacy that was open to all department employees.  Kimberly Brodie, Special Assistant in the Office of Educational Technology, led the discussion.  Tessa Jolls of the Consortium was an invited speaker, as well as Doug Levin of Cable in the Classroom, the U.S. cable industry’s education foundation.

Research Media Literacy

Research that provides evidence of the effectiveness of media literacy education is so important, and yet can be so difficult to find.  In this issue, we review the literature in the field, and we offer research and resources to contextualize the issues that need to be addressed to move the field forward.  

Professional Development

In our research section, we review current research and trends in professional development for K-12 educators, and discuss the opportunities which recently developed models of professional development present for dissemination of media literacy concepts and pedagogy. 

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