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Current Monthly Issue: Citizenship in the Digital Age.  All newsletters here.

 
What is Media Literacy? New Video Explains 
 
Media Literacy Now (MLN) and the Center for Media Literacy (CML) present “What is Media Literacy?,” a collaborative project produced with creative input from Transformative Culture Project that simplifies the task of explaining media literacy to policymakers and others who have the power to transform the education system. This video promotes media literacy and digital citizenship as a solution for educators in a social media wilderness buffeted by fake news. “What is Media Literacy?” introduces the concept of media literacy as a key that unlocks meaning behind the messages that we see, and allows us to be more thoughtful and deliberate as we create our own messages – such as those we create and share on social media. The  video deploys CML’s evidence-based “Five Key Questions” for consumers as a structure to illustrate the basics of how media literacy education develops critical thinking skills. https://youtu.be/BxFCTU18Sa0 
 
Fake News
 
Stories about so-called “fake news” abound, and while the term is bandied about, it is little understood yet widely discussed.  Is “fake news” about bias?  About disagreements on fundamental principles or arguments?  About verifiable falsehoods or perceptions about truths?  About generating revenues through attention-seeking headlines and fabricated story lines?  As we often say in media literacy, we have questions about the answers.  But we can say with confidence that no one should “outsource” their brain for others to decide, nor do we wish to invite censorship or filtering.  As power flows to individuals through social media, the traditional notions of journalism are upended and we are now all citizen journalists, with the collective and individual responsibility to be thoughtful and critical before circulating or consuming opinions or gossip or so-called “fact.”  Whom do we trust, about what, and why? Who decides? Who checks the checkers?  Yes, we need media literacy!

 

Commit2MediaLit! Campaign - Watch Now
 
The campaign Commit2MediaLit! was launched for Media Literacy Week October 31-November 4 and includes messages from students and media literacy advocates around the world.  Go to CML's YouTube for short video interviews of college students, taught by Dr. Natasha Casey and Spencer Brayton at Blackburn College in Carlinville, IL. and Brooklyn College students, taught by Dr. Belinha De Abreu.  Also,  media literacy practitioners attending major meetings in San Francisco, Sao Paulo and Rome.  https://www.youtube.com/user/medialitkit.
 
Media Literacy Week Oct. 31-Nov. 4, 2016!
 

Media Literacy Week is quickly approaching.  Want to get involved? Contact NAMLE today!
cache of artifacts from Media Literacy Week/LA 2015 -- includes activities and information for media literacy advocates, educators, librarians, and community members. 

Papers and Reports

Peer Reviewed Articles 

"Radicalization in Cyberspace: Enlisting Media and Information Literacy in the Battle for Hearts and Minds," by Tessa Jolls and Carolyn Wilson, is an article just published on p. 167 in the MILID Yearbook, a collaboration between UNESCO, UNITWIN Cooperation Programme on MIL and Intercultural Dialogue, UNAOC and GAPMIL. The 2016 theme of the Yearbook, edited by Jagtar Singh, Paulette Kerr and Esther Hamburger, is "Media and Information Literacy: Reinforcing Human Rights, Countering Radicalization and Extremism."

Evidence-Based Curriculum and Framework:  CML's media literacy framework and violence-prevention curriculum have undergone rigorous evaluation through UCLA with  funding from the Centers for Disease Control.  The longitudinal evaluation of CML's framework and curriculum, Beyond Blame: Challenging Violence in the Media, is now complete and peer-reviewed; this evaluation addresses middle school students' acquisition of content knowledge, and positive changes in attitudes and behaviors:    Longitudinal research.   Additionally, research about Beyond Blame was published in the Journal of Children and Media to address changes in knowledge and critical thinking amongst middle school students:     Find the article here.

MILID Yearbook 2015Media and Information Literacy for the Sustainable Development Goals.  Includes an article by Carolyn Wilson and CML's Tessa Jolls titled Media and Information Literacy Education: Fundamentals for Global Teaching and Learning.   UNITWIN Cooperation Programme on Media and Information Literacy and Intercultural Dialogue (MILID) is based on an initiative from UNESCO and the UN Alliance of Civilizations. Together with International Clearinghouse on Children, Youth and Media at NORDICOM, University of Gothenburg, they have published the MILID Yearbook 2015. Find the Yearbook here.

The Journal of Media Literacy Education includes an article called The Core Concepts: Fundamental to Media Literacy Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow by Tessa Jolls and Carolyn Wilson. The article explores the development of media literacy education from a Canadian and U.S. perspective. Translated into Spanish by Eduteka at:  http://eduteka.icesi.edu.co/articulos/cml-cinco-conceptos

How must curricula change with the new demands for global education and for learning anytimeanywhere? CML's Tessa Jolls explores these questions in the Journal of Media Literacy Education, in her article "The New Curricula, Propelling the Growth of Media Literacy Education.”  Translated into Spanish by Eduteka at:  http://eduteka.icesi.edu.co/articulos/tessa-jolls-alfabetismo-en-medios-1

Additional Reports and Articles

Children and parents: Media use and attitudes report 2015. This report from Ofcom examines children's media literacy. It provides detailed evidence on media use, attitudes and understanding among children and young people aged 5-15, as well as detailed information about the media access and use of young children aged 3-4. The report also includes findings relating to parents' views about their children's media use, and the ways that parents seek - or decide not - to monitor or limit use of different types of media.

A blue-ribbon panel calls for media literacy to be at the heart of education in this Aspen Institute Report - Learner at the Center of a Networked World from the Aspen Institute Task Force on Learning and the Internet (2014).
 
How do Digital Media & Learning (DML) and Media Literacy Communities Connect? Why is it important that these communities work together towards common goals?  Henry Jenkins, a leading thinker and University of Southern California (USC) researcher at the forefront of understanding the effects of participatory media on society, politics and culture, and CML’s Tessa Jolls explore these timely questions and more.  Check out the conversation here.
 
"Media for media literacy: Discourses of the media literacy education movement in "Media&Values" magazine, 1977-1993, by Michael RobbGrieco, Ph.D., Temple University, 2014.  This dissertation contributes to the history of media literacy by tracing the emergence and development of media literacy concepts and practices in Media&Values magazine (1977-1993), which spoke across discourse communities of scholars, teachers, activists and media professionals to build a media literacy movement in the U.S.  Elizabeth Thoman, founded Media&Values Magazine and CML; check the Media&Values Archives.
 
 

Education Resources  

Questions/TIPS (Q/TIPS) Framework:  Evidence-Based. Used throughout the world, CML's framework for inquiry-based media literacy features CML's Five Core Concepts and Five Key Questions of Media Literacy for Deconstruction and Construction. Q/TIPS addresses questions from the viewpoints of both consumers and producers of media messages.  Q/TIPS chart is available  in a variety of languages through our Global OnRamp Resources. Go to CML Store for FREE download.

Media Literacy: A System for Learning AnyTime, AnyWhere...This is an ideal resource for administrators and staff who want to implement a comprehensive and systematic media literacy program in their district or school with a research-based framework. Media Literacy: A System for Learning has three parts: Change Management, Deconstruction, and Critical Construction. Each part includes a corresponding e-book, Professional Development module, and Tools for Implementation. Read the e-books: Change Management and Deconstruction/Construction. Other Trilogy resources can be found in the online store.

Breakfast Epiphanies: Project-Based Learning Through Media Literacy and Nutrition. Now available in the CML Store.  Students learn to discern meaningful nutrition information using online resources while also working as a team to create healthful messages with technology tools.

Introducing Smoke Detectors! Deconstructing Tobacco Use in Media. This is a new curriculum available for middle and high school students. Utilizing CML’s research-based framework, students learn to deconstruct media depictions of smoking and how product placement works. Smoke Detectors! also teaches students to identify smoking incidents in media using a method developed by the American Cancer Society. With these tools, students are better prepared to make informed choices about smoking.

A Recipe for Action: Deconstructing Food AdvertisingThis curriculum ties together the critical thinking skills of media literacy with a nutrition theme that meets national education standards for middle schools in Language Arts, Health, and Technology.

Beyond Blame: Challenging Violence in the Media.  Stop the circle of blame with this research-based middle-school curriculum for youth violence prevention.  Curriculum includes 10 Complete Lessons, Educator Guide, Professional Development Module, DVD of media clips, and Student WorkbookLessons address newly adopted National Core Standards for English/Language Arts, as well as national standards for Health Education and Technology. 

A longitudinal evaluation of Beyond Blame is available.  Additionally, research about Beyond Blame was published in the Journal of Children and Media to address changes in knowledge and critical thinking amongst middle school students:     Find the article here.

Presented at the National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE) conference in Philadelphia, PA. CML President and CEO Tessa Jolls introduced: The Voices of Media Literacy. Read the interviews of 20+ International Pioneers.

Visit our online store for media literacy publications, tools for curricular design and lesson plans, and professional development. Literacy for the 21st Century now available in Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic, and Turkish! We now offer Korean translations for Q/TIPS and a MediaLit Moments activity.

Media Literacy Around the World

Global OnRamp Resources - CML's acclaimed evidence-based framework for media literacy provides a global standard that is widely used by educators around the world.   In an effort to promote media literacy worldwide, we are offering FREE materials in a variety of languages (English, Spanish, Portuguese, Turkish, Arabic, Korean). Global OnRamp resources are available as FREE downloads through the CML Store.  
 
Young African Leaders Initiative referenced CML's Five Key Questions and Core Concepts in a recent article published about media literacy.  https://youngafricanleaders.state.gov/media-literacy-five-core-concepts/  
 
The Global Media Literacy Imperative by Tessa Jolls was published in the Russian-American Education Forum Online Journal, May 2014. This article places media literacy as a key skill for competitiveness in global labor markets.
 

UNESCO, UNAOC and the Global Alliance for Partnerships on Media and Information Literacy (GAPMIL) honored Tessa Jolls with the International Media and Information Literacy Award at their flagship conference held June 26-27, 2015 in Philadelphia, USA.   

UNESCO International Conference on Media and Information Literacy for Knowledge Societies was held in Moscow, June 2012  President and CEO Tessa Jolls submitted a paper titled Media Literacy: The Foundation for Anywhere, Anytime Learning.

Support Media Literacy 

The Consortium for Media Literacy, a nonprofit project of Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs (SEE) accepts tax-deductible donations to further development of Media Literacy through program implementation and research. The Center for Media Literacy does not accept charitable contributions.

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MILID Yearbook 2016.pdf195.69 KB