FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions 

About CML
 

About CML

How did the Center start?
The Center for Media Literacy, incorporated in 1989 as the Center for Media and Values, is an outgrowth of Media&Values magazine which was founded by Elizabeth Thoman in 1977. In 1993, the name was changed to the Center for Media Literacy. Tessa Jolls became President in 1999 and she continues in that role. Check out the history of the magazine as well as the history of CML at the following sections of this website:
History and Milestones
Media&Values magazine / Founding Inspiration
 
 
What is the Center's philosophy of education?
The Center for Media Literacy adopted this philosophy to articulate its Empowerment Through Education approach to media literacy.
 
 
Where does CML get its funding?
The Center for Media Literacy is an independent for-profit organization that is self-sustaining. The Consortium for Media Literacy is a 501(c)3 project of Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs (SEE).  Our services are available to all schools and organizations, whether public, private or parochial.From 1983 — 1989, Media&Values magazine was owned by the Media Action Research Center, a non-profit coalition of primarily Protestant and Jewish national agencies that backed the magazine's raising of critical questions about contemporary media issues. As a nonprofit organization until 2006, it is a testament to the support of numerous religious foundations and agencies of all denominations that the Center for Media Literacy and Media&Values was able to take root and grow during its early history and that the Center has been able to apply for and receive financial support at critical times for the development of innovative projects such as Beyond Blame: Challenging Violence in the Media, for publishing projects on sexism and racial/ethnic issues in media as well as for this website.
 
Is CML a religious or political organization?
No, CML is an independent non-partisan organization. Our services are available to all schools and organizations, whether public, private or parochial.From 1983 — 1989, Media& Values magazine was owned by the Media Action Research Center, a non-profit coalition of primarily Protestant and Jewish national agencies that backed the magazine's raising of critical questions about contemporary media issues. It is a testament to the support of numerous religious foundations and agencies of all denominations that Media&Values was able to take root and grow during its early history and that up until 2006, the Center was able to apply for and receive financial support at critical times for the development of innovative projects such as Beyond Blame: Challenging Violence in the Media, for publishing projects on sexism and racial/ethnic issues in media as well as for this website.
 
Does CML sponsor a national conference?
National conferences require a huge commitment of an organization's staff time, energy and funding. CML cannot undertake such an effort so in 1997, CML was one of four founders of the Partnership for Media Education (PME), a coalition of organizations and individuals whose goal would be to organize and raise funds for a regular national conference. Following successful events in Colorado Springs (1998), St. Paul (1999) and Toronto (2000), the PME evolved in 2001 into the Alliance for a Media Literate America (AMLA), a national professional membership organization established to advance the field of media literacy education in the United States, including the holding of a national conference every two years. CML invites all persons interested in media literacy to join the National Association for Media Literacy Education (formerly AMLA) and attend the national conference.
 
How can I contact CML if I am interested in more information?
Select Contact Us from the website menu or email cml@medialit.com